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HOW TO READ THE TABLATURE

Contrary to what we usually think, tablature is not a transcription we have recently started to use. It's origin goes all the way back to the sixteenth century. It is useful because it allows you to play the guitar without knowing how to read music and shows us immediately what frets and strings to use.
If you have never read tablature, you need to take a few minutes to understand how it works and know how to recognize the symbols that appear on the lines, which are the strings of the guitar.
Each line of the tablature is a guitar string, as shown in the figures below. The first string in tablature is the high E string and the sixth string is the low E String. So the tablature basically shows the neck of the guitar and the strings.
Guitar neck
Tablature lines
Now, the symbols that appear at the beginning, for instance, could be the symbol 4/4 which is the time of the song. The number placed on a line of tablature indicates you have to press that fret on that string.
Tablature third fret
In the next example you have to press the third fret on the first string.
Tablature first fret
In the next however, we must press the first fret on the third string.
Tablature open string
Zero indicates to play a string open, in this case, the sixth low E string has no fret to be pressed so the string is played open.
The fingering of the left hand:
The fingering of the left hand is represented by circled numbers that are always at the bottom of the tablature. The index finger is indicated by the circled number 1, the middle by 2, the ring by 3 and the little finger by 4.

The example below shows fingering for the first 4 frets. Press the first string down by using the fingers as stated in the diagram and photograph.
Left hand fingering
Right hand fingering
The fingering of the right hand:
In this book we will only use three fingers of right hand to perform all the exercises and songs. This is the easiest way for a beginner to learn the technique of alternating bass.

To pluck the strings I use the thumb (p), the index (i) and the middle (m). The fingers used are indicated above the tablature.
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TIP OF THE WEEK
The Orchestral Guitar
The tremendous influence of Jimi Hendrix on rock guitar cannot be denied. As other guitarists of his time processed conservative influences, Hendrix was giving a new definition to rock guitar playing. He unleashed, with his Stratocaster and his Marshall amp, sounds that, up to that point, had been inconceivable. It was truly a "second electrification" of the guitar. He was no longer playing a guitar over an amplifier, he was playing electric guitar, breaking the ground for today's rock music. His orchestral rhythm licks pointed the way for all guitarists that came after him.

He was born on Dec. 27 th, 1942, in Seattle, Washington. In the mid-50's he began to play the guitar. It was an auspicious time: Rock'n'Roll was popular and R + B was no further away than one's hand was to the nearest radio. Jimi played in local high-school bands. After his compulsory term in the army (which he couldn't avoid without serving a term in prison) he played in many Rock'n'Roll, R + B and Soul bands such as: Little Richard's Band, the Isley Brothers, Solomon Burke and Curtis Knight, to name a few.

Chas Chandler, at that time the bassist for a group coiled the Animals, heard Hendrix, recognized his potential and talked the guitarist into going back to England with him. At that point, the blues was very popular in England, and guitar heroes were in vogue. There he formed the Jimi Hendrix Experience. In 1967, the group recorded its first single "Hey Joe", which became a hit in the Top Ten. Then followed the first LP "Are you Experienced?". Shortly after that he returned to the U.S. to appear at the Monterey Pop Festival. By 1970 he had brought out numerous LPs, played at the legandary Woodstock Festival and built his own recording studio. He had other big plans (recordings with Miles Davis and Gil Evans) but they were never to be.
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